Contact Information 

District Offices
Tiadaghton Valley Mall
Room 105
701 Allegheny Street, Box 4
Jersey Shore, PA 17740
(570) 398-4476

Closed for lunch: 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Tuesdays from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Thursdays 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Closed Monday, Wednesday and Friday

Penn Hills Plaza, Halls Station
21 Kristi Road
Suite 1
Muncy, PA 17756
(570) 546-2084

Closed for lunch: 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Monday through Friday: 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Capitol Office
Hon. Garth Everett
401 Irvis Office Building
PO Box 202084
Harrisburg PA 17120-2084
(717) 787-5270
Fax: (717) 772-9958

E-Mail:  
geverett@pahousegop.com

$275,000 in School Safety Grants Awarded to School Districts
11/2/2018
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Legislative Report
#Listrak\DateStampLong# The latest news from the State Capitol

$275,000 in School Safety Grants Awarded to School Districts
 
I am pleased to announce that $25,000 School Safety and Security grants were awarded to each school district in the 84th District through the School Safety and Security Committee within the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency.

Investing in school safety has been the utmost priority of ours. This grant program ensures individualized security plans are supported and schools can use the funding an assortment of measures, including metal detectors, school resource officers, school safety assessments and preplanning, and other upgrades to ensure the safety of teachers and students. We were proud to support this program and are happy to see our local schools benefit from it.

The School Safety and Security Grant Program provides grants to school districts, intermediate units, area vocational-technical schools, charter schools and private residential rehabilitative institutions for a wide variety of projects to improve school safety.

The new program was created as part of a comprehensive school safety bill that was signed into law in June. More than $60 million in new funding was dedicated in the current year’s budget to improve school safety.


Health Insurance Help? Nov. 1 Begins Open Enrollment
Open enrollment for the Health Insurance Marketplace began Thursday, Nov. 1, and runs through Dec. 15, 2018, with coverage beginning Jan. 1, 2019. Pennsylvanians looking to enroll in a health insurance plan for next year can compare plans and sign up on Healthcare.gov and returning enrollees can save significant amounts on their premiums by actively shopping around for a more affordable plan that meets their needs.

For 2019, there are six insurers in Pennsylvania offering Marketplace plans: Ambetter (Centene), which is new to the Pennsylvania market; Capital BlueCross; Geisinger Health Plan; Highmark; Independence Blue Cross; and UPMC. Many networks have expanded and are offering enhanced benefits such as wellness programs and telehealth services to counteract increases in deductibles and out of pocket maximums. All consumers re-enrolling in coverage are encouraged to review and update their income and demographic information on their Marketplace application.

The Pennsylvania Association of Community Health Centers (PACHC) and its statewide membership of community-based health care organizations provide free, personal, no pressure, no obligation, non-biased enrollment assistance to individuals seeking the security of health insurance coverage. Federally certified health center-based enrollment assisters, certified application counselors and navigators, are trained and ready to help individuals navigate the enrollment process, including evaluation of plan options and cost. Individuals seeking information on enrollment assistance or primary health care can locate a local community health center using the Need Health Insurance Help link on the PACHC website at bit.ly/enrollment_assistance or by calling the PACHC Navigator Hub toll-free hotline, 1-866-944-CARE (1-866-944-2273).
 

Deer on the Move; Motorists Use Caution
With deer becoming increasingly active, and daylight saving time soon to put more vehicles on the road during the hours when deer move most, the Pennsylvania Game Commission is advising motorists to slow down and stay alert.

When daylight saving time ends Nov. 4, there also will be increased vehicular traffic between dusk and dawn – the peak hours for deer activity.

Drivers can reduce their chances of collisions with deer by staying alert and better understanding deer behavior. Just paying attention while driving on stretches marked with “Deer Crossing” signs can make a difference.

Deer often travel in family groups and walk single file. So even if one deer successfully crosses the road in front of a driver, it doesn’t mean the threat is over. Another could be right behind it.

A driver who hits a deer with vehicle is not required to report the accident to the Game Commission.

If a deer is struck by a vehicle, but not killed, drivers are urged to maintain their distance because some deer might recover and move on. However, if a deer does not move on, or poses a public safety risk, drivers are encouraged to report the incident to a Game Commission regional office or other local law enforcement agency. If the deer must be put down, the Game Commission will direct the proper person to do so.

To report a dead deer for removal from state roads, motorists can call the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation at 1-800-FIX-ROAD.
 

Fighting Opioid Abuse
A new law that requires opioids to be prescribed electronically will bring consistency in the way prescriptions are filled and will also prevent the fraudulent use of prescription pads to fuel the opioid crisis.

At one time, written prescriptions were the safest form of prescribing opioids, which state law required. Since that time and the rise of the opioid epidemic, providers’ prescription pads have been stolen, leading to fraudulent use and driving fake prescriptions for the addictive drug.

Act 96 of 2018 (formerly House Bill 353) will make it more difficult to have fake prescriptions filled, while also making it more convenient for patients who have a legitimate need for the medication. Currently, most all medications are prescribed electronically.

Another benefit of e-prescribing is that the tracking of the prescription can go directly to the state’s prescription drug monitoring database to help ensure only those who have a legitimate medical need for these prescriptions can access them.
 

Assistance for Grandparents Raising Grandchildren Now Law
Two new laws signed by the governor will assist grandparents raising their grandchildren and help them better access both private and public resources.

House Bill 2133, now Act 89 of 2018, will establish the Kinship Caregiver Navigator Program, an informational resource for these grandparents that will operate both as a website and a toll-free hotline. The website will offer information on support and services available, and a specially trained navigator through the hotline will be able to provide support and guidance to kinship caregivers, and serve as a mediator to establish relationships between kinship caregivers and relevant federal, state and local agency staff.

The cost to state taxpayers will be greatly reduced, as the Commonwealth just received $479,307 from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Administration for Children and Families to develop the program.

Another measure to help grandchildren, House Bill 1539, now Act 88 of 2018, will allow grandparents to have temporary guardianship when the parents of the grandchildren are unable to care for them primarily due to substance abuse issues.

An estimated 82,000 grandparents are the sole caregivers for nearly 89,000 grandchildren in Pennsylvania.
 

Governor’s Vetoes Perplex Lawmakers

The governor’s decision to veto important cost-saving and education measures last week has perplexed lawmakers.

The bills would have dramatically reduced the state’s debt (House Bill 83), required the Department of Human Services to institute work requirements for Medical Assistance recipients (House Bill 2138), and expanded career and technical education (CTE) opportunities for students across Pennsylvania (House Bill 2157).

Specifically, both House Bill 83 and House Bill 2157 passed with overwhelming bipartisan majorities in both the House and Senate. House Bill 83 could have reduced outstanding general obligation debt by $1 billion over 20 years, and House Bill 2157 would have made it easier for schools to establish and renew vocational programs.

This is the second time that Gov. Tom Wolf has vetoed work requirements for able-bodied individuals on Medical Assistance, even though work requirements are in place for food stamp assistance.

All three bills are expected to be reintroduced in the new 2019-20 legislative session.
 

Turn Those Clocks Back This Weekend
Daylight saving time will end at 2 a.m. on Sunday, Nov. 4, and Pennsylvania residents will be turning their clocks back one hour before going to bed on Saturday night.

Experts recommend using this reminder to check or change the batteries in smoke detectors and carbon monoxide alarms. Smoke detectors and carbon monoxide alarms should be replaced every 10 years, and located near bedrooms and on each level of the residence.
 
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Office Locations
Penn Hills Plaza, Halls Station, 21 Kristi Road, Suite 1, Muncy, PA 17756 | Phone: (570) 546-2084
Tiadaghton Valley Mall, Room 105, 701 Allegheny Street, Box 4. Jersey Shore, PA 17740 | Phone: (570) 398-4476               
430 Irvis Office Building, PO Box 202084, Harrisburg PA 17120-2084 | Phone: (717) 787-5270
Email: geverett@pahousegop.com
TTY: 855-282-0614 
     
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